SDL2 Moving to CMake?

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our mixed
configure/make and msvc projects.

  • Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
    cygwin), and linux.
  • It can generate the appropriate project files for various platforms,
    IDEs, and compilers.
  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly (especially
    for people who want to avoid the commandline)
  • Will help keep all the different project files in sync

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with CMake,
or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the building
process of SDL.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two people
volunteering to help make it possible.

Sam, Ryan, Community, what are your thoughts?

On, Mon Aug 13, 2012, Alex Barry wrote:

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our mixed
configure/make and msvc projects.

  • Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
    cygwin), and linux.
  • It can generate the appropriate project files for various platforms,
    IDEs, and compilers.
  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly (especially
    for people who want to avoid the commandline)
  • Will help keep all the different project files in sync

+1 for cmake.

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with CMake,
or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the building
process of SDL.

For those, who might think that the above means “addition to the current
process”: it adds no additional layer or step, since it can fully replace the
autotools stuff.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two people
volunteering to help make it possible.

I can lend a hand on that.

Cheers
Marcus
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+1 i can also lend a hand if neededOn Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 6:11 PM, Marcus von Appen wrote:

On, Mon Aug 13, 2012, Alex Barry wrote:

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our mixed
configure/make and msvc projects.

  • Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
    cygwin), and linux.
  • It can generate the appropriate project files for various platforms,
    IDEs, and compilers.
  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly (especially
    for people who want to avoid the commandline)
  • Will help keep all the different project files in sync

+1 for cmake.

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with CMake,
or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the building
process of SDL.

For those, who might think that the above means “addition to the current
process”: it adds no additional layer or step, since it can fully replace the
autotools stuff.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two people
volunteering to help make it possible.

I can lend a hand on that.

Cheers
Marcus


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

Interestingly, Mr. Gordon wrote "The world longs for a hero named CMake"
in a recent commit:

1 Like

Hi

I had to move some of my own project to cmake… because more and more people use it.

My experience is that :

  • cmake langage isn’t really clean (spaces, case, arguments, …),
  • there is many different custom implementation of FindXXX.cmake,
  • it’s hard to play with rpath+cross-compilation,
  • there isn’t custom hook (post install…),
  • it’s so tempting to (re)write crappy macro,
    (… not exhaustive)

I regret to feel so uncomfortable with this program because of it growing usage…

I would have prefered to learn scons… or other alternatives.

However, i think that cmake is “better” (easier ?) than autotools.

Regards.

Paul.

Le 08/13/2012 05:11 AM, Alex Barry a ?crit :> I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more

attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our mixed
configure/make and msvc projects.

- Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
cygwin), and linux.
- It can generate the appropriate project files for various platforms,
IDEs, and compilers.
- It makes build customization a little more user friendly (especially
for people who want to avoid the commandline)
- Will help keep all the different project files in sync

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with CMake,
or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the building
process of SDL.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two people
volunteering to help make it possible.

Sam, Ryan, Community, what are your thoughts?


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

How do i compile a cmake version of sdl in msvc?On Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 10:11 PM, Alex Barry <alex.barry at gmail.com> wrote:

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our mixed
configure/make and msvc projects.

  • Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
    cygwin), and linux.
  • It can generate the appropriate project files for various platforms,
    IDEs, and compilers.
  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly (especially
    for people who want to avoid the commandline)
  • Will help keep all the different project files in sync

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with
CMake, or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the
building process of SDL.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two people
volunteering to help make it possible.

Sam, Ryan, Community, what are your thoughts?


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

You will need to use the CMake application to generate a MSVC compatible
build file.

http://www.cmake.org/

-DanOn Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 4:51 PM, R Manard wrote:

How do i compile a cmake version of sdl in msvc?

On Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 10:11 PM, Alex Barry <alex.barry at gmail.com> wrote:

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our mixed
configure/make and msvc projects.

  • Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
    cygwin), and linux.
  • It can generate the appropriate project files for various
    platforms, IDEs, and compilers.
  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly
    (especially for people who want to avoid the commandline)
  • Will help keep all the different project files in sync

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with
CMake, or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the
building process of SDL.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two
people volunteering to help make it possible.

Sam, Ryan, Community, what are your thoughts?


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

Message-ID:
<CAJSO58NJ08WoBnYhPPGh7nSJT13YgGkofYrmpOmeY_x-eJS=Hg at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=“iso-8859-1”

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our mixed
configure/make and msvc projects.

  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly (especially
    for people who want to avoid the commandline)

It does have a commandline version available though, correct? If not,
then that would likely be an actual problem.

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with CMake,
or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the building
process of SDL.

As long as it can be used with both it’s gui and the command line,
that shouldn’t be a problem that’s big enough to stop a transition.> Date: Sun, 12 Aug 2012 23:11:00 -0400

From: Alex Barry <alex.barry at gmail.com>
To: SDL Mailing List
Subject: [SDL] SDL2 Moving to CMake?

wow. so its a cross platform compiler like msvc but not as advanced?On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 6:54 PM, Daniel Leslie wrote:

You will need to use the CMake application to generate a MSVC compatible
build file.

http://www.cmake.org/

-Dan

On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 4:51 PM, R Manard <@R_Manard> wrote:

How do i compile a cmake version of sdl in msvc?

On Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 10:11 PM, Alex Barry <alex.barry at gmail.com>wrote:

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our
mixed configure/make and msvc projects.

  • Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
    cygwin), and linux.
  • It can generate the appropriate project files for various
    platforms, IDEs, and compilers.
  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly
    (especially for people who want to avoid the commandline)
  • Will help keep all the different project files in sync

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with
CMake, or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the
building process of SDL.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two
people volunteering to help make it possible.

Sam, Ryan, Community, what are your thoughts?


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

i think i get it, it makes a cmake file but if i want i can just delete it
and use msvc as noirmal. i’ve done that with cmake projects in the past and
now i see that cmake can be a visual project enviroment like msvc. is cmake
for those that don’t understand msvc or or their compiler of choice has no
visual project management?On Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 4:49 AM, R Manard <@R_Manard> wrote:

wow. so its a cross platform compiler like msvc but not as advanced?

On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 6:54 PM, Daniel Leslie wrote:

You will need to use the CMake application to generate a MSVC compatible
build file.

http://www.cmake.org/

-Dan

On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 4:51 PM, R Manard <@R_Manard> wrote:

How do i compile a cmake version of sdl in msvc?

On Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 10:11 PM, Alex Barry <alex.barry at gmail.com>wrote:

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our
mixed configure/make and msvc projects.

  • Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
    cygwin), and linux.
  • It can generate the appropriate project files for various
    platforms, IDEs, and compilers.
  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly
    (especially for people who want to avoid the commandline)
  • Will help keep all the different project files in sync

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with
CMake, or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the
building process of SDL.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two
people volunteering to help make it possible.

Sam, Ryan, Community, what are your thoughts?


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

after a couple hours of goofle the last puzzle parts fall into place. cmake
was made because people thought msvc was too hard to use without a helper
program. Now that msvc has evolved some still love cmake but others find it
redundant and useless, or even an extra level of complexity to overcome.
https://plus.google.com/112611842306597061311/posts/1FZG3Wx8XTt#112611842306597061311/posts/1FZG3Wx8XTtOn Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 5:22 AM, R Manard <@R_Manard> wrote:

i think i get it, it makes a cmake file but if i want i can just delete it
and use msvc as noirmal. i’ve done that with cmake projects in the past and
now i see that cmake can be a visual project enviroment like msvc. is cmake
for those that don’t understand msvc or or their compiler of choice has no
visual project management?

On Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 4:49 AM, R Manard <@R_Manard> wrote:

wow. so its a cross platform compiler like msvc but not as advanced?

On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 6:54 PM, Daniel Leslie wrote:

You will need to use the CMake application to generate a MSVC compatible
build file.

http://www.cmake.org/

-Dan

On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 4:51 PM, R Manard <@R_Manard> wrote:

How do i compile a cmake version of sdl in msvc?

On Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 10:11 PM, Alex Barry <alex.barry at gmail.com>wrote:

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our
mixed configure/make and msvc projects.

  • Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
    cygwin), and linux.
  • It can generate the appropriate project files for various
    platforms, IDEs, and compilers.
  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly
    (especially for people who want to avoid the commandline)
  • Will help keep all the different project files in sync

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with
CMake, or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the
building process of SDL.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two
people volunteering to help make it possible.

Sam, Ryan, Community, what are your thoughts?


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

A lot of people dislike auto* tools and libtool if not loathe them and I
don’t blame them. auto* tools and libtool are awful, but that’s not saying
CMake is perfect either. In a lot of ways working with CMake is a breath of
fresh air compared to auto* tools and libtool but one really nice thing is
you can have a single set of config files which when used with CMake can
output build infrastructure for POSIX OS (make Makefiles), MSVC project
files, Xcode project, etc. Having to maintain those separately is a recipe
for insanity and disaster. The G+ thread you’re referencing is pretty bad.
It’s a rant from someone that does not understand the issues with auto*
tools vs CMake and why CMake makes sense or the failings of auto* tools
when trying to target other platforms and their native compiler/tools.On Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 06:07:34AM -0500, R Manard wrote:

after a couple hours of goofle the last puzzle parts fall into place. cmake
was made because people thought msvc was too hard to use without a helper
program. Now that msvc has evolved some still love cmake but others find it
redundant and useless, or even an extra level of complexity to overcome.
https://plus.google.com/112611842306597061311/posts/1FZG3Wx8XTt#112611842306597061311/posts/1FZG3Wx8XTt


This message has been scanned for viruses and
dangerous content by MailScanner, and is
believed to be clean.

wow. so its a cross platform compiler like msvc but not as advanced?
I’m curious, since when is msvc a cross platform compiler? Can you run
it on Linux, Mac, Win, etc. like CMake?

PaulOn 08/14/12 11:49, R Manard wrote:

On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 6:54 PM, Daniel Leslie <dan at ironoxide.ca <mailto:dan at ironoxide.ca>> wrote:

You will need to use the CMake application to generate a MSVC
compatible build file.

http://www.cmake.org/

-Dan


On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 4:51 PM, R Manard <dranikist at gmail.com <mailto:dranikist at gmail.com>> wrote:

    How do i compile a cmake version of sdl in msvc?

    On Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 10:11 PM, Alex Barry <alex.barry at gmail.com <mailto:alex.barry at gmail.com>> wrote:

        I just read this in another thread and think it deserves
        some more attention in a general sense.

        I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers
        over our mixed configure/make and msvc projects.

          * Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows
            (msvc, mingw32, cygwin), and linux.
          * It can generate the appropriate project files for
            various platforms, IDEs, and compilers.
          * It makes build customization a little more user
            friendly (especially for people who want to avoid the
            commandline)
          * Will help keep all the different project files in sync

        The only downside I can see is that not everyone is
        comfortable with CMake, or with the general idea of adding
        another layer/step in the building process of SDL.

        I don't know much about making CMake files, but I recall
        one or two people volunteering to help make it possible.

        Sam, Ryan, Community, what are your thoughts?

        _______________________________________________
        SDL mailing list
        SDL at lists.libsdl.org <mailto:SDL at lists.libsdl.org>
        http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org



    _______________________________________________
    SDL mailing list
    SDL at lists.libsdl.org <mailto:SDL at lists.libsdl.org>
    http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org



_______________________________________________
SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org <mailto:SDL at lists.libsdl.org>
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

CMake is not a compiler (and neither is MSVC…). CMake uses a build
description to generate platform-specific project files for a number of
build tools/IDEs. You choose to generate Makefiles (like autotools does),
Xcode projects, Code::Blocks projects (only with a Makefile, though),
Visual Studio projects, or others. It makes a very cross-platform project
like SDL much more manageable for those who maintain the build process.

Jonny D

CMake isn’t a compiler. CMake just holds all the information about a
project, and it can generate a msvc project file/solution, or unix
makefiles, or code::blocks projects, and a few other nifty things. The
reason it may be important to the future of SDL2 is to make it easy to
update various project files (like xcode, msvc, etc.) without actually
having to update various projects. But, you still get to use msvc, or the
compiler of your choice.

After I typed this, I realized John beat me to the punchline, but I’ll post
anyway.On Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 6:22 AM, R Manard wrote:

i think i get it, it makes a cmake file but if i want i can just delete it
and use msvc as noirmal. i’ve done that with cmake projects in the past and
now i see that cmake can be a visual project enviroment like msvc. is cmake
for those that don’t understand msvc or or their compiler of choice has no
visual project management?

On Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 4:49 AM, R Manard wrote:

wow. so its a cross platform compiler like msvc but not as advanced?

On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 6:54 PM, Daniel Leslie wrote:

You will need to use the CMake application to generate a MSVC compatible
build file.

http://www.cmake.org/

-Dan

On Mon, Aug 13, 2012 at 4:51 PM, R Manard wrote:

How do i compile a cmake version of sdl in msvc?

On Sun, Aug 12, 2012 at 10:11 PM, Alex Barry <@Alex_Barry>wrote:

I just read this in another thread and think it deserves some more
attention in a general sense.

I also wanted to bring up the advantages that CMake offers over our
mixed configure/make and msvc projects.

  • Cmake is portable - it works across Mac, Windows (msvc, mingw32,
    cygwin), and linux.
  • It can generate the appropriate project files for various
    platforms, IDEs, and compilers.
  • It makes build customization a little more user friendly
    (especially for people who want to avoid the commandline)
  • Will help keep all the different project files in sync

The only downside I can see is that not everyone is comfortable with
CMake, or with the general idea of adding another layer/step in the
building process of SDL.

I don’t know much about making CMake files, but I recall one or two
people volunteering to help make it possible.

Sam, Ryan, Community, what are your thoughts?


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
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I’ve used CMake on Linux with no issues (and that version of Linux was
using ulibc). However, every time I’ve tried to use it on Windows,
I’ve had problems. When I tried using the prebuilt executables, all
the paths where it was looking for libraries were not set
appropriately for my machine. Have tried a few times to build cmake
from source, hoping I could set up the paths properly. Have not been
able to get it to build successfully. I’m using shell scripts to
build projects, so I need cmake to work with msys sh and make. If SDL
moves to using CMake, hope it continues to provide other alternatives
for building or supplies a way to make sure CMake is working properly
on each platform. If configure/make fails, I can jury-rig the
configure and edit the make and still build executables. If Cmake
fails, I’m not aware of any easy workarounds.

If anyone has tips on getting CMake to build properly with msys and
mingw or tips on what to do when CMake fails, I’d appreciate hearing
them. Thanks.

I’ve use CMake with msys/mingw for a few years now, and haven’t had any
issue. I had to do some initial configuration to use the mingw gcc
utilities, but after that, only a few hitches of finding paths for
different libraries. The reason finding libraries tends to work better on
linux is because cmake knows it can check /usr/lib and /usr/local/lib and
find almost any libraries you’re after, but on windows, it’s just a guess
at where “most” people install their library. On msvc, it probably checks
c:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 10\VC\lib , and msys, it checks
your MinGW’s version of unix’s /usr/lib and /usr/local/lib

But, I think everyone will agree that nothing is written in stone about
CMake, it’s just a suggestion, and we certainly wouldn’t just switch
without a transitional period (especially because anything new is liable to
break more often).

Also, Jared, I forgot to address your concern, but there is indeed both a
GUI and command-line interface for CMake, so everything should be okay on
that front :slight_smile:

-AlexOn Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 9:27 AM, LM wrote:

I’ve used CMake on Linux with no issues (and that version of Linux was
using ulibc). However, every time I’ve tried to use it on Windows,
I’ve had problems. When I tried using the prebuilt executables, all
the paths where it was looking for libraries were not set
appropriately for my machine. Have tried a few times to build cmake
from source, hoping I could set up the paths properly. Have not been
able to get it to build successfully. I’m using shell scripts to
build projects, so I need cmake to work with msys sh and make. If SDL
moves to using CMake, hope it continues to provide other alternatives
for building or supplies a way to make sure CMake is working properly
on each platform. If configure/make fails, I can jury-rig the
configure and edit the make and still build executables. If Cmake
fails, I’m not aware of any easy workarounds.

If anyone has tips on getting CMake to build properly with msys and
mingw or tips on what to do when CMake fails, I’d appreciate hearing
them. Thanks.


SDL mailing list
SDL at lists.libsdl.org
http://lists.libsdl.org/listinfo.cgi/sdl-libsdl.org

after a couple hours of goofle the last puzzle parts fall into place.
cmake was made because people thought msvc was too hard to use without a
helper program. Now that msvc has evolved some still love cmake but others
find it redundant and useless, or even an extra level of complexity to
overcome.

https://plus.google.com/112611842306597061311/posts/1FZG3Wx8XTt#112611842306597061311/posts/1FZG3Wx8XTt

What?..no. You consistently don’t read and jump to wrong conclusions.
Every post you make you’re getting told how way off base you are. Aren’t
you tired of it? Dude, seriously, you’re wrong all the time; slow down and
really read about the subject before you write posts or don’t write
anything at all if you don’t know what you’re saying.

CMake is not a crossplatform compiler. CMake is not something that was made
because MSVC is hard. CMake isn’t redundant and useless because MSVC
evolved. CMake is a metabuild system. It allows you to describe steps to
build your software, but the steps aren’t tied to a particular build system
such as MSVC or GNU make or Xcode. After running CMake, you’ll generate
files that can then be executed by your platform’s native build system.
It’s a way of not having to maintain multiple platforms’ build systems. It
saves time and effort when working on large, crossplatform projects. If you
had read CMake’s homepage, in the first paragraph you could see it’s
purpose:
“CMake generates native makefiles and workspaces that can be used in the
compiler environment of your choice.”

If you had read the wiki article, you could see it too:
“CMake can generate makefiles http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Makefile for
many platforms and IDEs including Unix http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unix,
Windows http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows, Mac OS
Xhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mac_OS_X
, OS/2 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OS/2,
MSVChttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MSVC
, Cygwin http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cygwin,
MinGWhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MinGW
and Xcode http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xcode.”

PatrickOn Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 6:07 AM, R Manard wrote:

Finally, I was wondering when someone was going to say this. It’s like
he’s in a rush to (use Slashdot parlance) get a first post. Without
knowing anything at all about the topic at hand.

SAOn August 14, 2012 12:00:48 PM Patrick Baggett wrote:

On Tue, Aug 14, 2012 at 6:07 AM, R Manard wrote:

after a couple hours of goofle the last puzzle parts fall into place.
cmake was made because people thought msvc was too hard to use
without a helper program. Now that msvc has evolved some still love
cmake but others find it redundant and useless, or even an extra
level of complexity to overcome.

https://plus.google.com/112611842306597061311/posts/1FZG3Wx8XTt#11261
1842306597061311/posts/1FZG3Wx8XTt

What?..no. You consistently don’t read and jump to wrong conclusions.
Every post you make you’re getting told how way off base you are.
Aren’t you tired of it? Dude, seriously, you’re wrong all the time;
slow down and really read about the subject before you write posts or
don’t write anything at all if you don’t know what you’re saying.

Alex Barry wrote:

I’ve use CMake with msys/mingw for a few years now, and haven’t had any
issue. I had to do some initial configuration to use the mingw gcc
utilities, but after that, only a few hitches of finding paths for
different libraries. The reason finding libraries tends to work better on
linux is because cmake knows it can check /usr/lib and /usr/local/lib and
find almost any libraries you’re after, but on windows, it’s just a guess
at where “most” people install their library. On msvc, it probably checks
c:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio 10\VC\lib , and msys, it checks
your MinGW’s version of unix’s /usr/lib and /usr/local/lib

I seem to remember it checking the registry for paths as well as
checking specific locations for library files. If it just used the
/usr/local/lib in msys like it does on Linux, I’d have had no problem.

Did you build CMake from scratch on Windows or just download the
executable? I just posted on the CMake list to see if anyone had some
suggestions on getting it to build from source on Windows with mingw
and msys.

But, I think everyone will agree that nothing is written in stone about
CMake, it’s just a suggestion, and we certainly wouldn’t just switch
without a transitional period (especially because anything new is liable to
break more often).

A transitional period would be good. It would be nice to have an
easier solution for building on Windows (or at least a list of steps
from start to finish that actually work) before fully switching.